What’s With Fake News These Days?

When we hear something like, “no, that isn’t news,” we often translate it into saying that an article is news but isn’t newsworthy or interesting, right? And while it’s easy and perfectly normal to read or hear daily news reports and articles that don’t fancy or even irritate you, nothing is really more annoying and disturbing than fake news.

The modern definition of what fake news are these days has substantially changed. The intention or objective of publishing them also has changed. For many of the instances, fake news are created by people who believe that the compelling subject or topic will force the hand of a reader to click on the link and read the content in its entirety. The saddest part of it is not the fact that readers are being deceived, but the realize that there never is truth to the news in the first place.

Perhaps the most terrifying aspect of fake news is the notion that its very purpose is to discredit the very foundations of credible journalism, plus the fact that it does nothing but to lure in readers for false information, in a manner that pretty much resembles how the devil tempts one person to do wrong. More and more people, even organizations, are using it since it’s one of the most effective ways of getting maximum attention without even spending a dime. In a way, fake news is done in the same outlook and perspective to that of a traditional advertising tool.

Another unsettling observation about fake news is that it usually is hosted on websites that have been intentionally built to mimic and appear like that of the most popular online news sites. Another outrageous thing about these fake news sites is that the name or domain they use are in a way synonymous or similar to actual and legitimate new sites, the obvious purpose of which is to create the impression that they are of the same nature.

So whenever a visitor clicks that link, he will be forwarded to the website where the false news is found and in return, that website gets a generous, even high traffic, something that will eventually translate into profit.

To attest to the legitimacy of the threat posed by this fake news trend, even the likes of international news agencies, more particularly BBC, is already doing something in order to stop these websites from wreaking havoc to the freedom of expression. The UK-based news agency recently launched a project that will make them use multiple verification of the information they receive before publishing it as news. The obvious purpose is to keep the BBC name out of the cloud of new agencies, websites, and social media platforms accused of entertaining, hosting, and even welcoming fake news.

Well, it’s painful to admit that BBC’s fight is something that has to considered as an uphill climb because with the rapid rise in popularity of fake news, it seems like readers, especially young ones, are more interested in what is intriguing and controversial without even verifying it is indeed is true.

Researched here: https://pligg.com/

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